What are Human Fine Arts Videos?

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The definition of “fine art” has shifted radically from what it was prior to the late-19th century. Although hints of abstract art have always existed, conceptual art began to gain popularity particularly during the 20th century. For whatever reason, the most revered modern and contemporary artists have chosen to ignore the traditional rules of convention, and attempted to forge new, daring paths in the world of fine art.

During the 1980’s, the late French philosopher Jean Baudrillard released his infamously controversial treatise entitled “Simulacra and Simulation.” While rather complex in his discourse on the “real,” one point that many creative-types found particularly disconcerting was the author’s assertion that artistic originality is no longer possible. Baudrillard argued that everything related to visual arts, writing, and music had been done to the point of exhaustion; and, thus, anything “new” would merely be an imitation of the “original” or “real.”

If you look around at art today, especially popular arts, Baudrillard might have had a point. From popular music to contemporary literature to comedy to fashion, almost every work borrows heavily from previous eras. There’s “retro” music, “retro” fashion, and comedic parody that hearkens back to previous works, artists, and trends, and oftentimes the interpretations are ironic. Baudrillard would argue that the irony and sarcasm of today is a symptom of exhaustion. Imitation and parody, from his perspective, are the only approaches to “originality” that remain.

Since “Simulacra and Simulation” was written in 1981, it lends very little credence to digital technology, because even a scholar of Baudrillard’s stature did not have the foresight to see what would occur over the following two decades. For instance, today’s fine arts human videos were not taken into consideration because digital video did not yet exist. Hence, any talk of fine art videos during that time would have meant analog VHS recordings.

If Baudrillard were alive today, a revision of his thesis might be warranted if he were to see a fine arts human video. Basically, a fine arts human video is one kind of fine arts video presentation on any of a diverse set of subject matters that can include dance, drama, sign language, miming, music, and different combinations thereof. Although some of the arts featured are more traditional, many performances are highly experimental, conceptual, and abstract.

Fine art has been an important part of civilization since history has been recorded. It is fascinating that just when you think you have seen everything that something highly original comes to your attention. The fact is artists have always borrowed and nothing is ever purely “original.” In fact, many people might argue rather convincingly that the more artists borrow, the more intriguing things become; and human fine arts videos are merely one example of that.

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